Munros, corbetts and Scottish mountains…|Patrick Sacco|KnowLedge World Network|Activities|KNOWLEDGE CAPITAL

  • 2020.07.10
  • Munros, corbetts and Scottish mountains…
Since I’ll be leaving Scotland soon to return to Canada, I have decided to visit some Scottish mountains and so some hiking before leaving.
Although the Scottish mountains may seem to be a bit small to those accustomed to the Alps or some other high mountain ranges, let us not forget that they almost always start from the sea level and even a smaller mountain can be hard to climb if you get to it.
In addition, the weather here in Scotland changes rather quickly, in fact thousands of people must be rescued every year after getting lost in the mist while walking on these mountains and, unfortunately, not all of them are found alive.
In a nutshell, one shall not take the mountains of Scotland too lightly.
The Scottish mountains are divided into two specific categories: below 3000 feet but above 2500 they are considered to be Corbetts, above 3000 feet they are called Munros.


The Highlands, symbol of Scotland in the common imagination, will leave you breathless for real: they are one of the most scenic regions in Europe with their green plateaus and mountain ranges, such as that of the Grampians where the Ben Nevis stands out.
The Highlands are a mountainous area covered with moors. Off the north coast are Orkney and Shetland islands while the Hebrides are grouped in front of the west coast. The Highlands coast is jagged with fjords that penetrate deep into the interior from where the mountain ranges start.
The Lowlands are formed by the valleys of the Tay, Forth and Clyde rivers: this is the most populated and most industrialized region in the country and three quarters of the Scots live here.
The Lowlands border the Highlands and also the Uplands are a mountainous region but less famous than the Highlands.


One of the most accessible and easiest to climb mountain in Scotland is Ben Lomond which is a munro, probably also the most popular one given its proximity to the urban area of Glasgow and the ease of its ascent and descent.
However, it can be problematic for those with little experience in these latitudes and climate as I read it takes about three hours to reach the top even though the path is well maintained and the views of Loch Lomond are incredible from the top and worth the effort.
I read that if instead you prefer to do a long walk not for beginners, you can try the Ben Macdui found in the Cairngorns in the Highlands. It is the second highest Scottish peak after the Ben Nevis.
They say that climbing or hiking the Ben Macdui is a mystical experience: some blame it on the effects of the sunlight striking the mountain sides, while others say that they feel a presence when they go to the top of this mountain. After all, the Scottish light and atmosphere is unique, at times mystical, other times eerie.
The Ben Vrackie is a corbett and therefore under 3000 feet in height. Relatively easy to climb it seems and it is located near the town of Pitlochry in Perthshire and therefore easily accessible even by those who do not want to venture far into the Highlands. It is said that even the Vikings passed through here.
Ultimately, the Ben Nevis is the highest mountain in the United Kingdom, it is located in the Highlands near Fort William and Loch Ness. Extremely popular both for walks and for climbing and despite its not so dizzying height it is also a danger for those who are not prepared. The path normally used is called Pony Track and has existed since the 19th century.

REPOTER

  • Patrick Sacco
  • AgeBird(TORI)
  • GenderMale
  • JobENGINEER AT ELLIOT & CO CONSULTING

HELLO! MY NAME IS PATRICK AND I LIVE IN EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND, WHERE I WORK AS A CIVIL ENGINEER AND I’M ALSO AN AMATEUR POET IN MY SPARE TIME. I MOVED TO SCOTLAND ABOUT 9 YEARS AGO FROM ITALY AND I FELL IN LOVE WITH IT. SOME PEOPLE DON’T LIKE THE RAINY WEATHER BUT IT’S THIS TYPE OF WEATHER WHICH ALLOWS THIS REGION TO BE SO LUSH AND GREEN. WHENEVER I HAVE THE CHANCE I TAKE MY CAR TO THE COUNTRYSIDE AND I GO EXPLORE THE MANY LAKES AND VALLEYS AROUND EDINBURGH.

View a list of Patrick Sacco's

What's New

REPORTER

What's New

PAGE TOP