Germany’s strong connection to horses|Rim|KnowLedge World Network|Activities|KNOWLEDGE CAPITAL

  • 2016.09.27
  • Germany’s strong connection to horses
No matter where you go in the suburbs of Germany, you can always see the heart-warming sight of horses, cows, sheep, and other animals grazing.
Especially popular with girls are horseback riding. Tons of filly, unicorn, and other horse-themed items are made for girls from a young age, and they are a very familiar animal.

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In Germany, you can buy a horse for about 500 euro (about 50,000 to 60,000 Japanese yen), and parents often give them to their children as presents. That said, horses need to be fed in the morning and evening, have their straw cleaned, and be brushed, and so going horseback riding and taking care of them every day is quite a hassle. Because of this, most are kept in a rented stall at a riding club that cares for the horse on the owner’s behalf. The owner can ask the horse caretaker to take care of the horse in the busy morning hours or while on vacation, for example, and still enjoy raising his or her own horse. This is a fun thing that middle- to upper-class families can enjoy.
The average lifespan of a horse is 20 to 30 years, and some live as long as 40 years. They are extremely sensitive animals, and can tell right away when people are afraid of them.
However, Germans have many chances to be around horses from a young age, so most children are not afraid of them and can touch them on their forehead or the tip of their nose.
Ponies are an indispensable attraction for German children growing up and are often used in birthday parties and other events.

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Pferdesalbe that was first invented for horses is a gel-like ointment that is well-known in Germany. It is good for joint pain, stiff shoulders, muscular fatigue, and muscular pain.
The clear, blue-tinted gel blends well into skin, so rubbing it into painful spots has a cooling effect that diminishes pain.
In Japan, when you think of medicine for stiff shoulders or muscular pain, you think of Tiger Balm. In Germany, Pferdesalbe horse ointment with the logo of a horse instead of a tiger has been cherished for over 30 years.

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  • Rim
  • AgeTiger( TORA )
  • GenderFemale
  • JobIkebana activist

She is in my 5th year of living in Germany. Not forgetting the spirit of Wa, she is engaged in Japanese cultural activities that involve ikebana and kimono. She will continue to devote herself to spread the beauty of Japan and to pass it on to the next generation.

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