The thistle – Scotland’s national flower|Patrick Sacco|KnowLedge World Network|Activities|KNOWLEDGE CAPITAL

  • 2017.08.15
  • The thistle – Scotland’s national flower
England has the rose, Wales the narcissus, Ireland the clover and Scotland … the thistle.
According to Scottish people, nothing symbolizes Scotland better than this humble weed. But how did it become the proud emblem of an entire nation?
The thistle appeared for the first time as a Scottish symbol on silver coins coined by James III in the 1400s.

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Its mysterious origins


In fact, no one knows with certainty how the pink or violet thistle flower gained such importance. According to a legend, a group of Scottish warriors who had fallen asleep managed to avoid the ambush of the Norwegian army because one of the enemies stepped on a thorny plant and started screaming.
His cry of sorrow awakened the sleeping warriors who duly rejected the invaders and then adopted the thistle as a national symbol to thank the flower for this victory.
Of course there is no evidence to support this theory, but it is certainly very fascinating!

There is more than one type of thistle although not many people are aware of this. Scotland is home to several varieties of thistle, some native and other exotic, and no one knows for sure what the true symbol of the country is. Is it possibly the red cardio? Or rather than the Marian thistle? Could it be the donkey thistle instead?
Which could it be? Nobody knows the answer to this question but it’s not so important because this flower is pure poetry.

The thistle has not only inspired the ode to the romantic love of Rabbie Burns, but also it inspired some of the most beautiful and influential poems in literature. It has inspired a flow of consciousness, in which the poet reflects on everything, but also mysteries of the universe, mixing its smell with the wonders of whiskey.

The thistle has been an important symbol of Scottish heraldry for over 500 years. It is also one of the highest honors the country can assign to an individual. Founded by James III in 1687, the Noble Order of the Thistle awards this important knight title to those who have made an important contribution to the kingdom of Scotland and the United Kingdom. Only Her Majesty the Queen can decide to award such title, and a second honor for importance is only hat of the Noble Order of the Garter.

Thistles are not only found in gardens, parks, and the countryside in this country. Keep your eyes open and you will see the thistle emblem appear everywhere in Scotland, from the international rugby team shirts and local football teams shirts, to the logos of leading organizations and businesses, and even on police uniforms. It is a popular symbol on Scottish products and souvenirs alike.
Scotland’s National Symbol is a humble plant with purple flowers and sour leaves that is especially widespread in the Highlands and, according to the language of flowers, is an ancient Celtic symbol of nobility of character and birth.

The thistle is not only a flower but also a singular vegetable, great for the liver and for purifying the body but it needs a long preparation. Contrary to other vegetables, frost is critical to the thistle, in fact, after a frost, the consistency of this vegetable becomes tenderer. The flavor recalls that of the artichoke hence the name thistle or wild artichoke. It is a perennial herbaceous plant, with a greenish appearance and lighter or whitish stems, and up to two meters wide, with leaves and in some cases thorns.
Used wild in extracts and herbal teas, the thistle is known for its purifying virtues, particularly as a liver tonic due to the presence of a substance known as silibine that helps get rid of the toxins accumulated in the body.

It also has laxative properties, being very rich in fiber. It also contains antioxidant substances that help keep the body young, as well as mineral salts and vitamins.



REPOTER

  • Patrick Sacco
  • AgeBird(TORI)
  • GenderMale
  • JobENGINEER AT ELLIOT & CO CONSULTING

HELLO! MY NAME IS PATRICK AND I LIVE IN EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND, WHERE I WORK AS A CIVIL ENGINEER AND I’M ALSO AN AMATEUR POET IN MY SPARE TIME. I MOVED TO SCOTLAND ABOUT 9 YEARS AGO FROM ITALY AND I FELL IN LOVE WITH IT. SOME PEOPLE DON’T LIKE THE RAINY WEATHER BUT IT’S THIS TYPE OF WEATHER WHICH ALLOWS THIS REGION TO BE SO LUSH AND GREEN. WHENEVER I HAVE THE CHANCE I TAKE MY CAR TO THE COUNTRYSIDE AND I GO EXPLORE THE MANY LAKES AND VALLEYS AROUND EDINBURGH.

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